4 Analyzed Poems Of Gabriel Okara

This article is posted on the ground of easing the view of the few poetic analysis of Gabriel Okara poems which are present in naijapoets.com by placing everything in just a place

(Analysis 1)
[QUESTION]
Discuss any 3 poetic devices employed in Gabriel Okara’s Piano And Drums (NECOJUNE/JULY 2016 LITERATURE-IN-ENGLISH)

[ANSWER]
To answer the above question, we’ll choose symbolism, personification and alliteration as our desired three poetic devices from Gabriel Okara’s poem “Piano And Drums”

#1) Symbolism which is the representation of a concept through symbols or underlying meanings of objects or qualities, appears in the poem from the title down to the context. “Drums” symbolizes Okara’s past uncivilized ways of life while “Piano” symbolizes the poet’s present and future existence in a westernized world. His symbolisms are further broadened with related musical dictions.

[You Can As Well Read Poetic Figures And Forms In The Piano And Drums By Gabriel]

#2) There are instances of personifications in the poem where inanimates are given human attributes. In line 15 (groping heart/ in green leaves) actually, line 15 can also be named a synedoche. In line 4-5 “speaking of/ primal Continue reading→

(Analysis 2)
Structure Of Piano And Drums By Gabriel

In order to understand the themes of the poem check Themes Of Piano And Drums by Gabriel

The structure of the poem shows that, it is a well planned poem. Like a narrative essay, the poem opened with an introduction describing the major concern of the poet and closed with a perfect conclusion. The poem was divided into stanzas to show where one view ends and where another begins. The last stanza was a perfect conclusion.

The poem is a free verse because of the ways the lines and stanzas were structured; void of rhyming pattern.

The first stanza had eight lines (using druming sound and rural activities to show the poet past way of life, the second stanza had eight lines describing what the effects of remembering the past was to the poet, stanza three had nine lines and that was where piano was described in the poem, stanza four had four linesContinue reading→

(Analysis 3)
Poetic Figures And Forms In Piano And Drums By Gabriel

As we’ve already known that Piano And Drums by Gabriel Okara is a culturally oriented poem comparing the poet’s past and present experiences. In looking at the figures and form of the poem, will it be perfect to refer to the poem as a non metred free verse? Yes.

Judging from the definition of free verse (“vers libre” in French language), any poem with no particular rhythm or metre and without a rhyme scheme can be referred to as a free verse. It is vivid how Gabriel Okara with this poem imitated Walt Whitman in creating impossible effects far beyond the boundaries that even blank verses can cross.

Gabriel Okara employed beautiful imageries an Continue reading→

(Analysis 4)
Themes of Piano and Drums by Gabriel

Gabriel Okara, the writer of “Piano and Drum” was born in Bayelsa state, Nigeria in 1921. A novelist and a poet; he was once a civil servant. His poem “Piano and Drums” was well beautified with imagery and symbolism.

The themes of the poem can be divided into three: (1) Childhood reminiscence and its effect (2) Complexity of the present and future (3) Dilemma.

Childhood reminiscence and its effect

Since the poem is about the poet’s experience with two different cultures or lifestyles, the poet used the experience of his village background to depict African culture which he grew up with, while comparing it to his present civilized way of living.
The poem speaker was reminded of his/her “primal youth and the beginning” through the quietness of the early to morning river and the echoing forest. While at the riverside, the poem speaker could “hear jungle drums telegraphing/the mystic rhythm…” (Line 2 &amp; 3) and other things like panther, leopard, hunters crouching<a href=”http://naijapoets.com/themes-of-piano-and-drums-by-gabriel-okara/classic-love-life/”>Continue reading→

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